When Theological Work is Dangerous

[from my new series of posts entitled, “Calvin & Coffee”…] Hazardous occupations: firefighting, police work, soldiering, espionage, high-rise construction, mining… …Theology? When we think of dangerous job profiles, “theologian” usually does not come to mind.  The stereotypical theologian wears tweed, smokes an occasional pipe, avoids manual labor, and haunts locally-owned coffee shops when not holed…

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Forestry + Theology

Before creation ethics was a top publishing topic, before ecological theology was hip, I was a forestry major at the University of Georgia.  And I wrote a senior thesis on God and Creation Care. (It was not very good.) I remember that at my paper presentation I was mildly attacked by one of the professors…

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“TORNADIC”: a terrible new vocab word

After providing links to my articles on God & Natural Disasters in the previous post, I found myself in the lower belly of my home with my wife and kids listening to one of those outdated relics from a bygone era—a “boom box.”  We were tracking the weather reports.  “Tornadic,” said the meteorologist. “Tornadic.” Do…

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More from Barth on Church Unity

In a recent post I commented on a couple of lectures Karl Barth made for the 1937 Edinburgh World Conference on Faith and Order.  These lectures are published in Karl Barth, The Church and the Churches (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2005).  Here are a few more thoughts…. In his third lecture, “The Union of the…

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Barth on the “Unthinkable” Reality of Church Disunity

I am certainly concerned with ecumenism, that is, the collaborative efforts to bring about international church unity.  But until reading a couple of Barth’s lectures published in The Church and the Churches [1], I lacked a proper sense of urgency. For Barth, there is only one Church.  There may be a multiplicity of localized faith…

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James K.A. Smith on Writing Theology

I just read two great blog posts by James K.A. Smith on writing.  In Writing (and) Theology, he expresses disappointment with the theologian’s tendency to focus on content to the neglect of form in their writing.  In (Unsolicited) Advice for Young (Theological) Authors he encourages us aspiring writer-theologian types to heed the wisdom of the…

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Euangelion | Dysangelion (Wisdom from Barth)

“Euangelion” is the English rendering of the Greek term for Gospel.  The “eu-” prefix means “good,” and the latter part of the word means “message.”  The opposite of “eu-” is the prefix “dys-.”  I really enjoy how words work, but I supply the grammatical tidbits for the sake of appreciating these great words from Karl…

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Terror & Tenderness: Taking Him in… all of Him

[I’m still trying to figure out the exact nature and purpose of Galadriel’s Mirror.  As I embark on a new vocational post leading University Christian Fellowship (UCF–www.ucfbirmingham.org), I do intend for the blog to offer material geared toward college students.  So many of the entries will summarize the fruits of study and the ongoing challenges…

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