Francis Watson’s Forthcoming Book: Rethinking Gospel Origins

The release date is still about 6 weeks away, but it will be worth keeping an eye on the discussion generated by Francis Watson’s Gospel Writing: A Canonical Perspective. Prof. Watson is my supervisor at Durham, so I am somewhat familiar with the material and arguments of the book (almost 700 pages). Here is the…

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The Pastor-Theologian and the Small Church

What is the best ecclesial context for doing theology as a “pastor-theologian”: a mega church or a small church? This is the question of my previous post, and I take up on those thoughts here focusing on the small church context… Theology in the Small Church The vocational model of “pastor-theologian” sounds a bit too…

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The Ideal Context for a Pastor-Theologian: Small Church or Mega Church?

In light of the previous post, “Will the Job Market Drive PhD Graduates into the Pulpit?“, I just wanted to think aloud with any interested readers on the ideal ecclesial setting for the vocational model of a “pastor-theologian.” For more on how I am envisioning this model of pastoral ministry, see here and here. I…

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Pastor-Theologian: Will the Job Market Drive PhD Graduates into the Pulpit?

While brewing a second cup of coffee to keep alert in my Greek readings this morning, I found Chris Spinks’ post “Avoid a PhD?” His reflections were stimulated by Anthony LeDonne’s most recent attempt to dissuade prospective PhD candidates from pursuing their vocational dreams (LeDonne offers such discouragement on a monthly basis). The gist of…

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The Biography of Death: A Tragedy

This is the story of Death. He was born in the most pristine of settings, at the dawn of creation. His first cries were heard amidst the teeming, shining newness of plants erupting joyfully from the fresh new earth. Along with the birdsong and the rippling rush of four rivers had been the sound of…

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dark

Dark. Tomb dark. The Light of the world is snuffed out. No city shines on the hill. The nearest hill around is called “Skull-Place,” and it’s marred by the black stains of dried blood. The sky was deathly quiet yesterday, on that Friday we now call “good.” Eloi, eloi, lema sabachthani? was met with no…

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The Hunger Games, the Tea Party, and the Misuse of Texts

I read in The Economist about the Tea Party’s recently released trailer that seems modeled after The Hunger Games. The allegorical portrayal equates big government social spending (the “Development Party”) with the tyrannical power-brokers of Panem’s “Capitol.” The Tea Party “Patriots” are hip-looking youngsters who Katniss Everdeen-like are attacking the system and standing up against…

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The Radical Movement needs a Complementary Pastoral Movement

Radical Christianity, Western/Suburban-Style Christianity Today has published an important essay by Matthew Lee Anderson on a movement of sorts now underway in American evangelicalism. Church leaders like David Platt, Kyle Idleman, Francis Chan, Shane Claiborne, and Stephen Furtick are calling for a radical commitment to the commands of Christ in their writing and preaching. Their…

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Drinking Jesus: New Wine and the Draught of Death

Holidays come with special meals. The smells wafting out of the kitchen can conjure memories of playing with our cousins, of long road trips, of good times with family and friends. That was happening the night Jesus sent disciples into Jerusalem to prepare for the Holy Day feast of Passover. The smoke from cooking fires…

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On-Site Theology

I temporarily suspended blogging, tweeting, and Facebooking for several weeks. Why? So I could finish writing a book on social media. The irony is delightful. I deal with online theology vs. offline theology in the a small chapter in the book; and I gave a brief treatment here on the blog. In this post, I…

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