The themes of Resurrection and New Creation are central to the ideas behind both TheoMedia and Faith Without Illusions. I found myself grappling with language sufficient for expressing the unimaginable—that the finality of death was checked by the emptying of a sealed tomb. And, of course, I fell quite short in finding such sufficient language. But may favorite sections of both books are probably those lines and paragraphs about Life’s mutiny against Death that we celebrate now at Eastertide. So I will be offering a few readings from the books over the next few weeks. This one is from the chapter on Resurrection and Ascension in TheoMedia…

There is no media silence like the silence of death. Nothing is quieter. No communicative breach is more definitive. Death is the ultimate act of relational closure… No relational distance is wider than that which is symbolized by a dirt-filled grave.

Or a sealed up tomb.

And that is precisely why no sound is more disruptive in a sin-plagued cosmos than the voice of a man once dead. No sound is more volatile in a death-governed world than the sound of man recently buried and now speaking. No sound is more eucatastrophic than the living speech of a death-silenced loved one…

Then I discuss baptism as a “focal media practice”[1] for the church:

Though a ritual practice, the act of baptism is also a media form, a highly visual and public depiction of our participation not only in Jesus’s death, but also in his resurrected life.

Like the Eucharist, there is a rich, multimedia quality to baptism. Consider the sound of water displaced and dripping (or perhaps pouring, depending on the mode of baptism practiced). Think of the sound of liturgical confession and ministerial pronouncement, the touch of soaked robes and wet floors, the sight of a saint dripping wet with the watery glory of a life yanked out of a spiritual grave. All of these elements convey together that Christ has penetrated that ultimate boundary wall of death itself and pulled us through the rent veil into the realm of life.

Though we live in a much lamented world of “media-saturation,” we should take note that the divine media of Easter and new creation are also out there. The difficulty is developing ears to hear and eyes to see…

[1] This phrase is an adaptation of “focal practice,” a phrase used by philosopher Albert Borgmann and recently discussed in Arthur Boers’ Living into Focus.

Leave a Reply